Instructional Design Workshops

The Teaching and Learning Center is excited to announce an upcoming series of Instructional Design workshops. The first two workshop topics are How to Write Learning Objectives and Course Mapping. Continue reading below for detailed information on these workshops.

Each session takes place at 920 Madison Ave. Suite 424 as outlined below.

How to Write Learning Objectives

Friday, July 14th • 2-3pm

Thursday, August 10th • 9-10am

Developing learning objectives is one of the most critical steps in the course development process. Well-constructed learning objectives allow educators to know what they will teach, students to know what they will learn, and others such as administrators and accreditation bodies to know what will be accomplished in the course. Learning objectives help all stakeholders involved to have a clear, uniform understanding of what will be achieved in the course.

By the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  • Define learning objectives
  • Explain the importance of learning objectives
  • Identify the components of a useful learning objective
  • Identify measurable verbs
  • Identify the six levels of intellectual skills in the cognitive domain
  • Identify good learning objectives
  • Write good learning objectives

Click here to register for the workshop on July 14th.

To participate in the July 14th session virtually, visit this Zoom link.

Click here to register for the workshop on August 10th.

To participate in the August 10th session virtually, visit this Zoom link.

Course Mapping

Tuesday, July 11th • 9-10am

Wednesday, August 16th • 2-3pm

Course mapping involves specifying the learning objectives for students and detailing what activities, experiences, resources, and support will be required across the entire course to achieve those outcomes. When learning activities relate directly to learning objectives and assessments accurately measure what students are learning, it is easier to meet course goals. If learning objectives, activities, resources, and assessments are not in alignment, students spend time on activities that do not lead to intended goals and the course may be disjointed and ineffective.

By the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  • Define course mapping
  • Explain the importance of course mapping
  • Identify the components of a useful course map
  • Identify a good course map
  • Classify learning objectives, activities, resources, and assessments on a course map

Click here to register for the workshop on July 11th.

To participate in the July 11th session virtually, please use this Zoom link.

Click here to register for the workshop on August 16th.

To participate in the August 16th session virtually, please use this Zoom link.

 

 

Contact us

Teaching and Learning Center
920 Madison Ave Ste 424
901-448-1218
tlc@uthsc.edu

Karen Shader, PhD
Associate Director
901-448-2947
kshader@uthsc.edu

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