HIROKO NISHIMURA, M.D., D.M.Sc.

Emeritus Professor
Physiology

Office: 302 Nash Research Building
Tel: (901) 448-5132
hnishimu@uthsc.edu

Education

  • M.D., Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan, Medicine
  • B.S., Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan, Pre-Medicine

Research description

The questions addressed in intact animals are further pursued at the tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. We use comparative approaches because they elucidate evolutionary perspectives of physiological functions and processes and provide unique animal models for biomedical research. Current resear ch includes three projects 1) vascular adaptation to high blood pressure and injury in intact and atherogenic vessels in fowl: Specifically the role of hemodynamic factors on development of neointima/atherosclerosis lesions, VSM phenotypes, extracellular matrix-integrin linkage, and protein profiles (biomarkers) of lesion-prone aorta have been examined at tissues and cellular levels. 2) Renin-angiotensin system and angiotensin receptors/signaling; biology of the renin-angiotensin cascade, and more recently, maturation-dependent of modulation of endothelial and VSM angiotensin receptor expressions are being investigated. 3) Comparative physiology of urine dilution and concentration, transport properties of renal tubules, and countercurrent urine concentration mechanism have been examined in intact animal and isolated perfused tubules. Aquaporin water channel homologues (qAQP1, qAQP2, qAQP4) have been identified and characterized in quail kidney. The role of AQP2 in fetal programming of adult water homeostasis is currently being studied.

Research interest/specialty

My research focuses on the humoral control of cardiovascular and renal homeostasis in intact and pathological states using integrative and comparative approaches.

Research interest/specialty

My research focuses on the humoral control of cardiovascular and renal homeostasis in intact and pathological states using integrative and comparative approaches.

Research description

The questions addressed in intact animals are further pursued at the tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. We use comparative approaches because they elucidate evolutionary perspectives of physiological functions and processes and provide unique animal models for biomedical research. Current resear ch includes three projects 1) vascular adaptation to high blood pressure and injury in intact and atherogenic vessels in fowl: Specifically the role of hemodynamic factors on development of neointima/atherosclerosis lesions, VSM phenotypes, extracellular matrix-integrin linkage, and protein profiles (biomarkers) of lesion-prone aorta have been examined at tissues and cellular levels. 2) Renin-angiotensin system and angiotensin receptors/signaling; biology of the renin-angiotensin cascade, and more recently, maturation-dependent of modulation of endothelial and VSM angiotensin receptor expressions are being investigated. 3) Comparative physiology of urine dilution and concentration, transport properties of renal tubules, and countercurrent urine concentration mechanism have been examined in intact animal and isolated perfused tubules. Aquaporin water channel homologues (qAQP1, qAQP2, qAQP4) have been identified and characterized in quail kidney. The role of AQP2 in fetal programming of adult water homeostasis is currently being studied.

Publications

  1. Nishimura, H. Urine concentration and avian aquaporin water channels. Pflugers Arch, 456 (4), 755-68, 2008.
  2. Nishimura, H, Yang, Y, Lau, K, Kuykindoll, RJ, Fan, Z, Yamaguchi, K, Yamamoto, T. Aquaporin-2 water channel in developing quail kidney: possible role in programming adult fluid homeostasis. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol, 293 (5), R2147-58, 2007.
  3. Yang, Y, Cui, Y, Fan, Z, Cook, GA, Nishimura, H. Two distinct aquaporin-4 cDNAs isolated from medullary cone of quail kidney. Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol, 147 (1), 84-93, 2007.
  4. Ruiz-Feria, CA, Yang, Y, Nishimura, H. Do incremental increases in blood pressure elicit neointimal plaques through endothelial injury. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol, 287 (6), R1486-93, 2004.
  5. Yang, Y, Cui, Y, Wang, W, Zhang, L, Bufford, L, Sasaki, S, Fan, Z, Nishimura, H. Molecular and functional characterization of a vasotocin-sensitive aquaporin water channel in quail kidney. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol, 287 (4), R915-24, 2004.
  6. Nishimura, H, Fan, Z. Sodium and water transport and urine concentration in avian kidney. Symp Soc Exp Biol (54), 129-51, 2004.
  7. Ruiz-Feria, CA, Zhang, D, Nishimura, H. Age- and sex-dependent changes in pulse pressure in fowl aorta. Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol, 137 (2), 311-20, 2004.
  8. Nishimura, H, Fan, Z. Regulation of water movement across vertebrate renal tubules. Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol, 136 (3), 479-98, 2003.
  9. Nishimura, H, Yang, Y, Hubert, C, Gasc, JM, Ruijtenbeek, K, De Mey, J, Boudier, HA, Corvol, P. Maturation-dependent changes of angiotensin receptor expression in fowl. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol, 285 (1), R231-42, 2003.
  10. Nishimura, H, Xi, Z, Zhang, L, Kempf, H, Wideman, RF, Corvol, P. Maturation-dependent neointima formation in fowl aorta. Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol, 130 (1), 39-54, 2001.
  11. Nishimura, H. Angiotensin receptors--evolutionary overview and perspectives. Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol, 128 (1), 11-30, 2001.
  12. Kuykindoll, RJ, Nishimura, H, Thomason, DB, Nishimoto, SK. Osteopontin expression in spontaneously developed neointima in fowl (Gallus gallus). J Exp Biol, 203 (Pt 2), 273-82, 2000.
  13. Qin, ZL, Yan, HQ, Nishimura, H. Vascular angiotensin II receptor and calcium signaling in toadfish. Gen Comp Endocrinol, 115 (1), 122-31, 1999.
  14. Shimada, T, Fabian, M, Yan, HQ, Nishimura, H. Control of vascular smooth muscle cell growth in fowl. Gen Comp Endocrinol, 112 (1), 115-28, 1998.
  15. Qin, ZL, Nishimura, H. Ca2+ signaling in fowl aortic smooth muscle increases during maturation but is impaired in neointimal plaques. J Exp Biol, 201 (Pt 11), 1695-705, 1998.
  16. Nishimura, H, Koseki, C, Patel, TB. Water transport in collecting ducts of Japanese quail. Am J Physiol, 271 (6 Pt 2), R1535-43, 1996.
  17. Kamimura, K, Nishimura, H, Bailey, JR. Blockade of beta-adrenoceptor in control of blood pressure in fowl. Am J Physiol, 269 (4 Pt 2), R914-22, 1995.
  18. Nishimura, H, Walker, OE, Patton, CM, Madison, AB, Chiu, AT, Keiser, J. Novel angiotensin receptor subtypes in fowl. Am J Physiol, 267 (5 Pt 2), R1174-81, 1994.
  19. Osono, E, Nishimura, H. Control of sodium and chloride transport in the thick ascending limb in the avian nephron. Am J Physiol, 267 (2 Pt 2), R455-62, 1994.
  20. Hasegawa, K, Nishimura, H, Khosla, MC. Angiotensin II-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation of fowl aorta. Am J Physiol, 264 (5 Pt 2), R903-11, 1993.
  21. Nakamura, Y, Madey, MA, Nishimura, H, Quach, D, Barajas, L. Lack of control of renin release by adrenergic nervous system in the aglomerular toadfish. Gen Comp Endocrinol, 88 (1), 62-75, 1992.
  22. Hasegawa, K, Nishimura, H. Humoral factor mediates acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation of chicken aorta. Gen Comp Endocrinol, 84 (1), 164-9, 1991.
  23. Stallone, JN, Nishimura, H, Nasjletti, A. Angiotensin II binding sites in aortic endothelium of domestic fowl. Am J Physiol, 258 (3 Pt 2), R777-82, 1990.
  24. Stallone, JN, Nishimura, H, Khosla, MC. Angiotensin II vascular receptors in fowl aorta: binding specificity and modulation by divalent cations and guanine nucleotides. J Pharmacol Exp Ther, 251 (3), 1076-82, 1989.
  25. Nishimura, H, Koseki, C, Imai, M, Braun, EJ. Sodium chloride and water transport in the thin descending limb of Henle of the quail. Am J Physiol, 257 (6 Pt 2), F994-1002, 1989.
  26. Yamaguchi, K, Nishimura, H. Angiotensin II-induced relaxation of fowl aorta. Am J Physiol, 255 (4 Pt 2), R591-9, 1988.
  27. Takei, Y, Stallone, JN, Nishimura, H, Campanile, CP. Angiotensin II receptors in the fowl aorta. Gen Comp Endocrinol, 69 (2), 205-16, 1988.