BARBARA H. CONNOLLY, EdD, DPT, MEd, BS, FAPTA

Professor Emeritus
Physical Therapy

Office: 621 930 MADISON BUILDING
930 MADISON AVENUE
MEMPHIS TN 381630000
Tel: (901) 448-5888
bconnolly@uthsc.edu

Education

  • D.P.T., University of Tennessee, Memphis, TN, Physical Therapy
  • Ed.D., University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, Education
  • M.Ed., University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, Education
  • B.S., University of Florida, Gainesville , Florida, Physical Therapy

Area of teaching/subject

Beliefs About the Teaching-Learning Process • Students learn from each other; faculty learns from students; an atmosphere should exist which encourages a free exchange of knowledge. • Competencies to be developed by students should be clearly stated so that students will understand the purpose of any learning experience. • Clinical practice and academic theory should be closely related in the curriculum because students learn best when relevance to practice is apparent. • The acquisition of simple skills early, in the curriculum, followed closely with opportunities to practice the skills with clients help to develop self-confidence in students. This confidence will not only reinforce learning, but will generate motivation for further learning. • Learning experiences which are inconsistent or conflicting with each other, or which provide negative feedback, create interference and prolong learning time. Experiences that reinforce each other and are accompanied by positive feedback are more easily and rapidly learned. • Ability to apply principles is of greater practical value than knowledge of many facts. • Students should have opportunities to identify how they learn best. A variety of teaching methods should be used in the curriculum to provide students who learn at different speeds and by different means with different learning opportunities. • Students will learn best how to become good interdisciplinary health workers with respect for other team members if they have many opportunities to interact with and learn from persons in other health disciplines. • Role models are important in students’ development of professional behavior. • Early treatment of students as colleagues facilitates internalization of the professional role. • Clinical education should provide a setting and planned opportunities for students to learn, including time for clinical educators to give feedback to students about their performance. • Clinical education should provide a setting that will enable the student to reach goals established jointly by the student, the clinical educator, and the academic faculty. • Learning experiences in the classroom and clinic should provide for progressively increasing complexity and breadth of application. • Learning occurs through emotional as well as intellectual involvement of the student.

Area of teaching/subject

Beliefs About the Teaching-Learning Process

  • Students learn from each other; faculty learns from students; an atmosphere should exist which encourages a free exchange of knowledge.
  • Competencies to be developed by students should be clearly stated so that students will understand the purpose of any learning experience.
  • Clinical practice and academic theory should be closely related in the curriculum because students learn best when relevance to practice is apparent.
  • The acquisition of simple skills early, in the curriculum, followed closely with opportunities to practice the skills with clients help to develop self-confidence in students. This confidence will not only reinforce learning, but will generate motivation for further learning.
  • Learning experiences which are inconsistent or conflicting with each other, or which provide negative feedback, create interference and prolong learning time. Experiences that reinforce each other and are accompanied by positive feedback are more easily and rapidly learned.
  • Ability to apply principles is of greater practical value than knowledge of many facts.
  • Students should have opportunities to identify how they learn best. A variety of teaching methods should be used in the curriculum to provide students who learn at different speeds and by different means with different learning opportunities.
  • Students will learn best how to become good interdisciplinary health workers with respect for other team members if they have many opportunities to interact with and learn from persons in other health disciplines.
  • Role models are important in studentsí development of professional behavior.
  • Early treatment of students as colleagues facilitates internalization of the professional role.
  • Clinical education should provide a setting and planned opportunities for students to learn, including time for clinical educators to give feedback to students about their performance.
  • Clinical education should provide a setting that will enable the student to reach goals established jointly by the student, the clinical educator, and the academic faculty.
  • Learning experiences in the classroom and clinic should provide for progressively increasing complexity and breadth of application.
  • Learning occurs through emotional as well as intellectual involvement of the student.

Publications

  1. Connolly, BH, Cook, B, Hunter, S, Laughter, M, Mills, A, Nordtvedt, N, Bush, A. Effects of backpack carriage on gait parameters in children. Pediatr Phys Ther, 20 (4), 347-55, 2008.
  2. Marchese, VG, Connolly, BH, Able, C, Booten, AR, Bowen, P, Porter, BM, Rai, SN, Hancock, ML, Pui, CH, Howard, S, Neel, MD, Kaste, SC. Relationships among severity of osteonecrosis, pain, range of motion, and functional mobility in children, adolescents, and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Phys Ther, 88 (3), 341-50, 2008.
  3. Barnhart Robert , Connolly B. Aging and Down Syndrome: Implications for Physical Therapy. Physical Therapy, 87, 1399-1406, 2007.
  4. Connolly, BH, Kasser, RJ. Rehabilitation of a child with a split cord malformation and hemimeningomyelocele. Pediatr Phys Ther, 14 (4), 208-13, 2006.
  5. Connolly, BH, Dalton, L, Smith, JB, Lamberth, NG, McCay, B, Murphy, W. Concurrent validity of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development II (BSID-II) Motor Scale and the Peabody Developmental Motor Scale II (PDMS-2) in 12-month-old infants. Pediatr Phys Ther, 18 (3), 190-6, 2006.
  6. Connolly BH. Issues in Aging with Life long Disabilities.. Revista Brasileira de Fisiotherapia ( Official journal of the Brazilian Physiotherapy Association), 10, 249-262, 2006.
  7. Connolly B, Scruggs L, Shipman S, Sutton A, Tomson S. Effects of Backpack Weight on the Gait of Children. Pediatric Physical Therapy. Pediatric Physical Therapy, 16, 51, 2004.
  8. Connolly, BH. Aging in individuals with lifelong disabilities. Phys Occup Ther Pediatr, 21 (4), 23-47, 2002.
  9. Connolly, BH, Lupinnaci, NS, Bush, AJ. Changes in attitudes and perceptions about research in physical therapy among professional physical therapist students and new graduates. Phys Ther, 81 (5), 1127-34, 2001.
  10. Connolly B. H. General Effects of Aging on Persons with Developmental Disabilities. Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation, 13:1-18, 1998.
  11. Connolly B. H, Stralka S. J. Interrater Reliability of the Polaroid Cam System for Assessment of Scoliosis. PHYSICAL THERAPY PRACTICE, 196-202, 1994.
  12. Connolly, BH, Morgan, SB, Russell, FF, Fulliton, WL. A longitudinal study of children with Down syndrome who experienced early intervention programming. Phys Ther, 73 (3), 170-9; discussion 179-81, 1993.
  13. Montgomery PC, Connolly BH. Standardized Testing in Pediatrics. Physical Therapy, 67, 1873-1876, 1987.
  14. Connolly B. H, Michael B. T. Performance of Retarded Children, with and without Down syndrome, on the Bruininks Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency. Physical Therapy, 66:344-348, 1986.
  15. Connolly, BH, Morgan, S, Russell, FF. Evaluation of children with Down syndrome who participated in an early intervention program. Second follow-up study. Phys Ther, 64 (10), 1515-9, 1984.
  16. Connolly BH, Michael BT. Early detection of scoliosis: A neurological approach using the asymmetrical tonic neck reflex. Physical Therapy, 64, 304-307, 1984.
  17. Connolly BH. Movement Assessment of Infants: A reliability study. Guest Commentary. Physical Therapy, 64, 475-476, 1984.
  18. Connolly BH, Morgan S, Russell FF. Evaluation of children with Down's syndrome who participated in an early intervention program. Physical Therapy, 64, 1515-1519, 1984.
  19. Connolly BH, Craik R, Krebs D. Single case research: When is it valid. Guest Editorial. Physical Therapy, 63, 1767-1768, 1983.
  20. Connolly , BH. Assessment of the Neonate: An Overview. Physical Therapy, 65, 1505-1513, 1983.
  21. Connolly BH, Morgan S, Richardson B, Russell F. An Interdisciplinary early intervention program: A follow up study.. Physical Therapy, 60, 1405-1408, 1980.
  22. Connolly, Barbara H. and Anderson , Robert M.. Preparing Physical Therapists for the Severely Handicapped: A Rationale for Competency Based Training. Allied Health and Behavioral Sciences, 1, 10-21, 1978.
  23. Connolly BH, Anderson RM. Severely handicapped children in the public schools: a new frontier for the physical therapist. Physical Therapy, 58, 433-438, 1978.
  24. Connolly B, Russell F. An Interdisciplinary Approach to early intervention. Physical Therapy (56), 155-158, 1976.