Ann K. Cashion, PhD, RN, FAAN

Professor and Chair, Acute and Chronic Care Department

Office: 507N 920 MADISON BUILDING
920 MADISON AVENUE
MEMPHIS TN 381630000
Tel: (901) 448-1176
acashion@uthsc.edu
http://www.utmem.edu/nursing/faculty%20and%20staff/cashion.php

Education

  • Ph.D., University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, Nursing
  • M.S.N., University of Arkansas Medical Science Campus, Little Rock, AR, Nursing/Adult Health
  • B.S.N., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Nursing

Research description

Ann Cashion, PhD, RN, FAAN, is Professor and Chair of the Department of Acute and Chronic Care in the College of Nursing at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis, TN. She serves as Director of the Community Engagement and Research Unit of the UT Clinical Translational Science Institute where she builds coalitions and works within communities to design research, practice, and policy strategies addressing community health care concerns. Her funded research and clinical interests target genetic/genomic and environmental components associated with outcomes of organ transplantation. In her most recently funded study (R01 NR9270) she combines emerging technologies (microarrays) and behavioral questionnaires to investigate gene-environment interactions leading to obesity in recipients of kidney transplantations during the first year after transplant. Her past research projects have focused on early biomarkers of acute rejection in recipients of pancreas transplantations. In addition to applying genomics to research, Dr. Cashion is committed to redesigning nursing curricula to incorporate the rapidly expanding genomic content. A strong genomic content base will allow nurses to be actively involved in practice and research in the emerging genomic era. She has mentored numerous doctoral students, two of whom have received NINR pre-doctoral funding (F31) allowing them to incorporate genomics into their programs of research. Dr. Cashion serves as Co-Chair of the CDC sponsored EGAPP (Evaluation of Genetic Applications for Prevention and Practice) Stakeholders Group, which engages stakeholders in the process of evaluating genetic tests and communicating utility information to providers, policy makers, and consumers. Other leadership experiences and honors include Past-President of the International Society of Nurses in Genetics, selection as one of 20 nurses into the 2005 Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellow program, selection as one of 10 featured nurse scientists on the Johnson and Johnson Nurse Scientists’ video, and receiving the International Society of Nurses in Genetics (ISONG) Founder’s Award in recognition of outstanding genetics research and scholarship. She has presented and published numerous times on her research findings related to transplantation and genetics. Her article titled “Emerging Genetic Technologies” was featured in the NINR Monthly Summaries of Nursing Research for April 2004. Dr. Cashion received her BSN from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, her MNSc from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences campus, and her PhD from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center where she has been on faculty since 1998.

Research interest/specialty

Genetics, environment and weight gain after transplantation.

Research interest/specialty

Genetics, environment and weight gain after transplantation.

Research description

Ann Cashion, PhD, RN, FAAN, is Professor and Chair of the Department of Acute and Chronic Care in the College of Nursing at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis, TN. She serves as Director of the Community Engagement and Research Unit of the UT Clinical Translational Science Institute where she builds coalitions and works within communities to design research, practice, and policy strategies addressing community health care concerns. Her funded research and clinical interests target genetic/genomic and environmental components associated with outcomes of organ transplantation. In her most recently funded study (R01 NR9270) she combines emerging technologies (microarrays) and behavioral questionnaires to investigate gene-environment interactions leading to obesity in recipients of kidney transplantations during the first year after transplant. Her past research projects have focused on early biomarkers of acute rejection in recipients of pancreas transplantations. In addition to applying genomics to research, Dr. Cashion is committed to redesigning nursing curricula to incorporate the rapidly expanding genomic content. A strong genomic content base will allow nurses to be actively involved in practice and research in the emerging genomic era. She has mentored numerous doctoral students, two of whom have received NINR pre-doctoral funding (F31) allowing them to incorporate genomics into their programs of research. Dr. Cashion serves as Co-Chair of the CDC sponsored EGAPP (Evaluation of Genetic Applications for Prevention and Practice) Stakeholders Group, which engages stakeholders in the process of evaluating genetic tests and communicating utility information to providers, policy makers, and consumers. Other leadership experiences and honors include Past-President of the International Society of Nurses in Genetics, selection as one of 20 nurses into the 2005 Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellow program, selection as one of 10 featured nurse scientists on the Johnson and Johnson Nurse Scientists’ video, and receiving the International Society of Nurses in Genetics (ISONG) Founder’s Award in recognition of outstanding genetics research and scholarship. She has presented and published numerous times on her research findings related to transplantation and genetics. Her article titled “Emerging Genetic Technologies” was featured in the NINR Monthly Summaries of Nursing Research for April 2004. Dr. Cashion received her BSN from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, her MNSc from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences campus, and her PhD from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center where she has been on faculty since 1998.

Publications

  1. Winsett, RP, Cashion, AK. The nursing research process. Nephrol Nurs J, 34 (6), 635-43, 2008.
  2. Sánchez, ZV, Cashion, AK, Cowan, PA, Jacob, SR, Wicks, MN, Velasquez-Mieyer, P. Perceived barriers and facilitators to physical activity in kidney transplant recipients. Prog Transplant, 17 (4), 324-31, 2007.
  3. Cashion, AK, Sánchez, ZV, Cowan, PA, Hathaway, DK, Lo Costello, A, Gaber, AO. Changes in weight during the first year after kidney transplantation. Prog Transplant, 17 (1), 40-7, 2007.
  4. Cashion, AK, Sabek, OM, Driscoll, CJ, Gaber, LW, Gaber, AO. Serial peripheral blood cytotoxic lymphocyte gene expression measurements for prediction of pancreas transplant rejection. Transplant Proc, 38 (10), 3676-7, 2006.
  5. Driscoll, CJ, Cashion, AK, Hathaway, DK, Thompson, C, Conley, Y, Riely, C, Xu, L, Homayouni, R. Blood gene expression profiling in liver transplant recipients with hepatitis C virus and posttransplantation diabetes mellitus. Transplant Proc, 38 (10), 3646-8, 2006.
  6. Driscoll, CJ, Cashion, AK, Hathaway, DK, Thompson, C, Conley, Y, Gaber, O, Vera, S, Shokouh-Amiri, H. Posttransplant diabetes mellitus in liver transplant recipients. Prog Transplant, 16 (2), 110-6, 2006.
  7. Cashion, AK, Holmes, SL, Arheart, KL, Acchiardo, SR, Hathaway, DK. Heart rate variability and mortality in patients with end stage renal disease. Nephrol Nurs J, 32 (2), 173-84, 2005.
  8. Cashion, AK, Holmes, SL, Hathaway, DK, Gaber, AO. Gastroparesis following kidney/pancreas transplant. Clin Transplant, 18 (3), 306-11, 2004.
  9. Cashion, AK, Driscoll, CJ. Genetics and kidney dysfunction. Nephrol Nurs J, 31 (1), 14-8, 29, 2004.
  10. Velasquez-Mieyer, PA, Umpierrez, GE, Lustig, RH, Cashion, AK, Cowan, PA, Christensen, M, Spencer, KA, Burghen, GA. Race affects insulin and GLP-1 secretion and response to a long-acting somatostatin analogue in obese adults. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord, 28 (2), 330-3, 2004.
  11. Cashion, AK, Driscoll, CJ, Sabek, O. Emerging genetic technologies in clinical and research settings. Biol Res Nurs, 5 (3), 159-67, 2004.
  12. Velasquez-Mieyer, PA, Cowan, PA, Umpierrez, GE, Lustig, RH, Cashion, AK, Burghen, GA. Racial differences in glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) concentrations and insulin dynamics during oral glucose tolerance test in obese subjects. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord, 27 (11), 1359-64, 2003.
  13. Hathaway, DK, Wicks, MN, Cashion, AK, Cowan, PA, Milstead, EJ, Gaber, AO. Posttransplant improvement in heart rate variability correlates with improved quality of life. West J Nurs Res, 22 (6), 749-68, 2000.
  14. Cashion, AK, Cowan, PA, Milstead, EJ, Gaber, AO, Hathaway, DK. Heart rate variability, mortality, and exercise in patients with end-stage renal disease. Prog Transplant, 10 (1), 10-6, 2000.
  15. Cashion, AK, Hathaway, DK, Milstead, EJ, Reed, L, Gaber, AO. Changes in patterns of 24-hr heart rate variability after kidney and kidney-pancreas transplant. Transplantation, 68 (12), 1846-50, 1999.
  16. Hathaway, DK, Wicks, MN, Cashion, AK, Cowan, PA, Milstead, EJ, Gaber, AO. Heart rate variability and quality of life following kidney and pancreas-kidney transplantation. Transplant Proc, 31 (1-2), 643-4, 1999.
  17. Hathaway, DK, Cashion, AK, Milstead, EJ, Winsett, RP, Cowan, PA, Wicks, MN, Gaber, AO. Autonomic dysregulation in patients awaiting kidney transplantation. Am J Kidney Dis, 32 (2), 221-9, 1998.
  18. Hathaway, DK, Cashion, AK, Wicks, MN, Milstead, EJ, Gaber, AO. Cardiovascular dysautonomia of patients with end-stage renal disease and type I or type II diabetes. Nurs Res, 47 (3), 171-9, 1998.